Archive for raft

R.A.F.T.

Posted in Leadership Coaching, Sales Coaching, Southwestern Consulting with tags , , on March 2, 2015 by Dustin Hillis

Flat Tire

My very first summer selling I was out in the backwoods of Missouri where I got not one, not two, not three, but 10 flat tires. My 10th flat tire happened while I was driving a rental car. By that time in the summer, I had gotten pretty quick at changing out a flat and had formed a habit of jumping out of the car to change it, timing myself to see how fast I could do it to try to beat my NASCAR pit crew record breaking time.

On this particular day, I did not beat my NASCAR pit crew record-breaking time because in that rental car I’d never had a flat tire. I put it on the jack and didn’t realize in that car you’re supposed to pull the emergency break before changing the tire. The car fell off of the jack. And if you’ve ever been in the backwoods of Missouri and have a car fall off its jack, I can promise you that you’ll understand that this is not a fun experience! So I ended up having to move the car and work as hard as I could to get the jack out from underneath the car, jack the car back up, and change the tire. It took forever!

I’m loading my boxes back into the trunk and I looked down and realized that my skin looked like it was moving for some odd reason. Upon further inspection, I realized that I was completely covered in ticks. It wasn’t just a few ticks; it was not just a couple of dozen ticks…I’m talking hundreds of ticks that were in the canopy of woods above my head while I was changing the tire which had been falling on my head for over an hour while I worked on that rental car.

What did I do? What any other rational human being would do…I freaked out!  I stripped down to the nude, took my clothes and threw them in a blue Walmart bag that was sitting in the back of the car because I didn’t want to get the ticks in the car. Then I jumped in the car and drove off still freaking out! I remember thinking, “What’s going on?  Why am I out here selling in the middle of Missouri?” I wanted to quit, I wanted to go home, and I determined that that’s what I was going to do.

I pulled up into the only gas station in the entire town. It was the hangout for the city. It was the only place to go, evidenced by all of the people there. I opened the door of the car and I realized—wait a minute—I’m buck naked!  So I jumped back in the car, reached into the Walmart bag and grabbed my covered-in-ticks pants, putting them back on while I started running across the gravel, bare feet and all.

I opened the door to the gas station and find an old lady sitting in the corner. She asked, “Son, what’s wrong with you?” “Lady, I have ticks!” I told her. I think she laughed while pointing me in the direction of the bathroom. I quickly grabbed the only thing I could find in the store to help my situation: a bottle of rubbing alcohol and a razor, and ran to the bathroom. Inside, I looked myself in the eyes and, for the first time in my life, was absolutely convinced I wanted to quit.

I never wanted to quit more at anything in my life. And I’m not a natural quitter. But this day, I wanted to pack up my bags and go home. I didn’t care how much money I was making. I wanted to quit. And I’ll never forget looking at myself in the mirror, just picking off ticks and feeling miserable and sorry for myself. It wasn’t a pretty sight.

It was during this time that something in me began to stir. I remembered going through  training at Southwestern before that summer began and hearing Lee McCroskey teach about this very time in one’s life, the point in which someone feels ready to quit. He explained that everybody has an excuse why they quit and quitting happens in different forms in each different person. Some people quit and literally go home. They are through. Some people quit mentally while keeping at it physically. Some people quit on a month; some on a week; some on a day; some on a goal period…

I’ll never forget hearing him say that and writing down on a card, “I will never quit on my summer, on a month, on a week, on a day, on a goal card or a customer.”  I pulled out that card and re-read it. Looking myself in the eye, I decided, “All right, I’m going to do this.” I took out that rubbing alcohol and razor and I shaved the ticks off, one by one. That wasn’t the best day that I’ve ever had, but it was one of my most important days of my life.

It was important because I made a decision that day to push through.

I didn’t quit.

I had a few customers after that and it was brutal. But you know what? I finished.

After that, quitting was never an option.

I want you to think of a time in your life where you wanted to quit at something—whatever it is—and you didn’t quit. You pushed through. As the country song goes, “…if you’re going through hell, you keep on going. And you get through before the devil notices you’re there.”
When have you done that? When have you pushed through pain to the break through on the other side? On the other side, life becomes easier and quitting becomes less and less of an enticing choice.

At Southwestern Consulting™, we created a technique to help you do this consistently. It’s called RAFT.

R-A-F-T.

Try to imagine this acronym as your life raft, as something that helps you navigate the tumultuous waters that life brings your way.

R stands for Realize. You have to realize an event is occurring. Many times, realizing that you’re in the middle of an event is the hardest part. What is an event? An event is anything that takes you off schedule, anything that takes you out of your routine, anything that takes you out of your normal rhythm.

In my story, my event was the flat tire and finding myself covered in ticks. Events come in all shapes and sizes. It could be as large as a crashing economy, death of a loved one or loss of a marriage. Or it could be as small as a rainy day, flat tire or bad hair day. All of those events, regardless of size, can end up disrupting your momentum.

A stands for Accept. You have to accept that the event is occurring. This is another very difficult part! Acceptance is a psychological action. When I was getting my Psychology Degree at the University at Tennessee in Knoxville, I was so interested to learn that what psychologists are really doing as part of their job is working to drive their clients towards acceptance.  More often than not, people don’t like accepting things.

There are three things in life that you should put your energy and focus on.

1.    Controllables (your work habits, attitude and schedule)
2.    Things that you can influence (people)
3.    Things you have to accept (the events in your life—these are things that you can’t control. Instead, you need to roll with the punches as they come at you)

What’s interesting is that most people choose to spend their time, energy and thoughts focused on things that they just should instead be accepting. But that’s not fun! Everybody loves to gossip, to have an excuse, to talk about why something can’t work. It’s a rare individual who doesn’t make an excuse, but instead finds a way.

F stands for Focus. You have to focus on the controllables. Like I said above, there are only three things you can control—one of which is your attitude. Attitude is a choice and I challenge you to choose wisely. You can also control your schedule and your activity. Are you making wise choices?

T stands for Transform. You must transform the negative event or the negative emotion into positive momentum. Emotions are good, but even bad emotions can be harnessed to slingshot you into positive and record-breaking production.

It’s not coincidence that the week I broke the company record for making the most money in a single week was the week following learning my parents were getting divorced.
At that time, I made a choice to do RAFT:  to focus on the controllables versus quitting. Football players do the same thing. They get knocked down. When I played football, after somebody blindsided me the first time, that was when I had my best game ever.

Make sure you’re doing the following:

1) Realize the event is occurring.
2) Accept that the event is occurring.
3) Focus on the controllables.
4) Take the momentum of the negative and slingshot yourself into positive momentum.

If you can do those things, you will be able to be self-controlled, break records and take it to the next level.

Do you want more information about the R.A.F.T technique and its components? Fill out the form below to get in touch and we’ll send you more information:

Being a Problem Solver

Posted in dustin hillis, Sales Coaching, southwestern company, southwestern company truth with tags , , , , on August 18, 2011 by Dustin Hillis

Top Producers are Problem Solvers.

MacGyver "The Problem Solver"

MacGyver "The Problem Solver"

Being a mentally tough Problem Solver is simple, but not easy.

3 steps on how to be a Problem Solver:

1. Embrace the challenge of an unexpected event!  

It was a mild summer day in the mountains of Fairbanks,  Alaska. I was driving between houses, demonstrating my Southwestern Company educational books and software, when I received a call from my brother, who was selling books in Michigan. I’ll never forget the first words that he said, “We need to talk.  It’s about Mom and Dad….they’re getting divorced.” The Alaskan sun was shining bright that day, but all of a sudden it felt like a rain cloud was pouring down over my head.

A flurry of emotions over took me that day… I had a problem that I didn’t know how to solve it!  Then a light bulb clicked on for me and I created the acronym R.A.F.T.

R.A.F.T. Problem Solving


R- Realize
an event has occurred. (usually an event is defined by anything that gets you off schedule- flat tire, the economy tanks, you get fired, death in the family, weather, a divorce, etc.)

A- Accept the event has occurred.  It is hard to accept that something is out of your control.  You cannot control who buys from you, the weather, death, taxes, the economy, divorce, etc.

F- Focus on the controllable factors.  In reality, the only things you can control is your attitude, your schedule, and your habits.  See previous blog titles “Controlling the Controllable” for more on this topic.

T- Transform the negative event into positive momentum. Being a top producer doesn’t mean that you encounter any less problems than anyone else.   Being a top producer means that you react to what happens to you in a positive and productive way.  As the old saying goes “you have to make lemonade out of the lemons”.

 

2.  Accountability, accountability, accountability.

Unsuccessful people are always blaming others for their failures.  Successful people take responsibility for their activity, circumstances, and results. To improve your self accountability every morning when you wake up say out loud 10 times “if it’s meant to be, it’s up to me”.

(If Accountability is something that’s hard for you, you should get a coach to hold you accountable to doing the things you know you should be doing)

 

3. Take Action Now!

Top Producers do not give into the Law Of Diminishing Intent. Everyone has good intentions. Everyone intends on doing what they say they are going to do. Everyone intends on hitting their goals. The reason people don’t do what they know they should do is because of the Law Of Diminishing Intent. Rory Vaden says it best “the longer the amount of time that goes by with out taking action the less likely someone is to actually do what they intend on doing”.

law of diminishing intent

I had a tough event to deal with in Alaska that summer. I had a decision to make. Was that event going to be an excuse for not hitting my goals?  Or would I hold myself accountable for my results, not letting any outside event derail me, by taking action immediately and doing the things I knew to do.  It was not easy to keep working, but the reality remained, there was nothing I could do about the problem.  After applying the 3 steps above I ended up earning more commissions by the end of that week than anyone else has ever earned in 155 years at the Southwestern Company.

For more information about the Southwestern Consulting sales coaching program to help hold you accountable and become a master problem solver: