Archive for the Sales Coaching Category

Unconditional Confidence

Posted in Leadership Coaching, Sales Coaching, Sales Tips, Southwestern Consulting with tags , on February 8, 2017 by Dustin Hillis

Do you believe confidence is something you are born with or not? At Southwestern Consulting, we found that confidence can be developed and strengthened through awareness and training. There are 3 Types of Confidence. We all have experienced all 3 types in some form or fashion in various ways. Our goal is to progress through the 3 types of confidence quickly and end up with Unconditional Confidence in every area of our lives.
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The 3 Types of Confidences: False Confidence, Conditional Confidence, and Unconditional Confidence.
False Confidence is saying you can do something, but deep down inside you think there is no way you can actually do the task. It is fake self-talk. A good example is someone whose group of friends talks and acts as though they were superman or superwoman, but when put into an unfamiliar selling situation, they change from superman to super-scared. False confidence comes from F.E.A.R. which is False Evidence Appearing Real. Sometimes we all have false confidence and “fake it until we make it”. However, we all want to move out of false confidence as quickly as possible.
Conditional Confidence is why a sales job can be frustrating and emotional. Why do you think that selling can be frustrating and emotional? It’s because we develop conditional confidence and attach our self-worth to results (aka whether or not we make a sale).  Many people have made one, two, or three sales in a row and their confidence goes way up. Then they go a day, a week, or a month with no sales and their confidence bottoms out. Conditional Confidence hits peaks and valleys like a roller coaster. This confidence is conditional on the outcome or result.
Unconditional Confidence is the most important type of confidence. It separates all top producers from average. Top Producers who strive for unconditional confidence have that something special—charisma, swagger, or mojo. How do you develop Unconditional Confidence? Unconditional confidence is based on your beliefs and habits. To develop unconditional confidence, you need to know that you do have innate skills and that your momentum comes from your work habits. Every day you can gain more confidence by focusing on the habits that are within your control.

There are 3 key areas that anyone can control every day:

  1. Your attitude, self-talk, and energy level. No one can control your attitude besides you. Knowing and believing you are created for a purpose and having positive self-talk is the most important area of focus in anyone’s life. Your energy level is a choice. Your attitude is a choice.
  2. Your schedule and time management. You determine what time you go to sleep, when you wake up, what time you make your first prospecting call, what time you make your last prospecting call, if you’re going to work on the weekends, or not. You are in control of your time.
  3. Your activity. No one can force you to work. You have to decide to get as much done as possible with the time allowed. Break your day into goal periods and decide what you are going to do with your time every minute, every hour of every day. Elon Musk (CEO of Tesla, Space X, and Solar City) breaks his day down to 5 minute time blocks that are scheduled before he starts every day.

The key to being unconditionally confident and having self-worth in business is to not attach your self-worth to how much you produce.  Your gauge on whether or not you’re doing a good job is based on work habits – Activity, Attitude, and Schedule. That way at the end of the day, you look in the mirror and don’t ask yourself “did I sell anything today?”  Instead you will ask yourself, “did I focus on controlling the controllable habits today and do my dead level best?”  When you are growing and improving every day in your beliefs and habits, you are creating Unconditional Confidence.

A good positive affirmation to use when forming unconditional confidence is saying to yourself every day when you look into the mirror:
“I do not expect success all the time, but due to the belief in my gifts and God-given abilities in addition to my knowledge and acquired skills, I can be fearless in the moment. In reality, self-worth has nothing to do with the outcome. So when the pressure comes, I cannot hesitate. Knowing sometimes I will do well and sometimes I won’t, regardless, I know failure is temporary and success will happen with perseverance.”

The Navigate Behavior Styles

Posted in dustin hillis, Leadership Coaching, Motivational, Sales Coaching, Sales Tips, southwestern company, southwestern company truth, Southwestern Consulting with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 2, 2016 by JordanKinard

While it may be no surprise that “Selling the way people like to buy” gives you the best chance to serve your customers and clients, knowing “how those people like to buy” is another story.

The Navigate system is built to help you understand the people around you, so that you can connect with your prospects in a deep and meaningful way during the sales cycle. Our years of research have found that people tend to fall into one of four dominant behavior styles: Fighters, Entertainers, Detectives, and Counselors.

As a Navigator it is important to understand these behavioral styles and be able to identify first your own style and then your prospects.

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  • Fighters are cut-to-the-chase, bottom-line drivers with little time and less patience. They are motivated by results, and it’s important to them to be in control.
  • Entertainers are social butterflies and enthusiastic extroverts. They love people, possibilities, and rapport—and they care more about emotions than facts.
  • Detectives are practical analysts. They are always on the hunt for details, and unlike Entertainers, they rank the value of facts over emotions every time.
  • Counselors are “steady Eddies.” Laid-back diplomats, they have the interest of the team at heart. They love security and consistency, and they make decisions by consensus.

These people probably sound familiar. You’ve met them all before in some shape or form, and a few of them have most likely driven you up the wall in the past. But when you begin to sell to the four behavior styles the way they like to buy, that paradigm of frustration changes fast.

All you have to do is learn to Navigate. Want to learn more?

 

Navigate is more than just a book. It’s a mindset.

Posted in dustin hillis, Leadership Coaching, Motivational, Prospecting Tips, Sales Coaching, Sales Tips, Selling Techniques, southwestern company, southwestern company truth on November 11, 2016 by JordanKinard

The Navigate process is not a quick easy fix to a broken sales philosophy. It’s not a way to manipulate a person with tricks or gimmicks and it’s definitely not a “get rich quick” system.

The path to being a successful top producer can be a long road that requires a great deal of work and a great deal of a sacrifice. However, those are some of the things that make it worth the journey.

The core fundamentals of becoming a Navigate top producer are hard work, a positive mental attitude, and a desire to be a student of the game. Only after you have bought in to these principles will you begin to push your sales success to the next level.

 

The difference between the ordinary salesperson and the extraordinary salesperson is mindset. With the goal of becoming a successful Navigator, you must develop an extraordinary mindset.

Different from an ordinary mindset, an extraordinary Navigate mindset is focused on serving others through adapting to their natural buying style. Someone with an ordinary mindset sells the way they personally would want to be sold. Someone with an extraordinary Navigate mindset sells the way others like to buy.

 

The Navigate Mindset:

  • You take the time to study buying behaviors and what makes them tick
  • You are aware of the 4 buying behavior styles and are always looking to identify someone’s style
  • You ask questions and care about the answers
  • You connect with people in a meaningful way
  • You can then provide true value for people and focus on their specific needs
  • You adapt your natural selling style to their buying style
  • You’re able to speak and act with integrity and make sure you do what is right
  • You help people buy the way they like to buy

 

It’s the Navigate mindset that separates you from the average salesperson.

 

With the Navigate mindset, your focus will always be serving and the byproduct will be selling. The Navigate process requires an “all in” mentality and it is then you begin to elevate your sales and elevate your success.

For a FREE webinar on the concepts of Navigate 2.0 click here!

 

Navigate 2.0 – Selling the Way People Like to Buy

Posted in Sales Coaching on October 24, 2016 by eweikert

My father once told me “people buy because they like you and trust you.”  People love to buy, but they hate to be sold. The best salespeople on the planet understand that building trust is key.

My new book Navigate 2.0 is about how to build trust and how to sell the way people like to buy. Most people sell the wrong way. Most people treat other people the way they personally would want to be treated. The problem with that approach is if you treat everyone the way you would want to be treated you are not connecting with ¾ of the buying behavior styles in the world.

While getting my Psychology degree at the University of Tennessee, I found it fascinating that there are four different personality/behavior styles. After attending the Southwestern Advantage training on “How to Sell Like a Chameleon”, I connected the dots between the DiSC and Myers-Briggs personality profiles, that I was studying in college, and how to apply the same science to selling. This epiphany was the turning point in my selling career. Applying the principles found in Navigate 2.0 helped me break the 150-year-old all-time sales record at the Southwestern Company, which made me the #1 producer out of over 150,000 salespeople who’ve successfully gone through the Southwestern door-to-door selling program.

Since co-founding Southwestern Consulting and co-creating the Navigate selling profile system, we have successfully implemented its proven methodologies and helped over 6,000 people increase their income by an average of over 23%!  Now you have access to the Navigate 2.0 content which will take your selling game to the next level and help you sell the way people like to buy.  Just click here and enjoy!

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Being Decisive

Posted in Leadership Coaching, Motivational, Sales Coaching, Sales Tips, Southwestern Consulting with tags , , , , on June 7, 2016 by Dustin Hillis

What do people like Richard Branson, Elon Musk, Mark Cuban and Mark Zuckerberg have in common? Other than being billionaires, they all are decisive. They know what they want. They understand their priorities. They make decisions. You’d probably never hear any of them say, “let me think about it”. Billionaires don’t have time to “think about it”; it’s either a “yes” or it’s a “no”. Opportunities are lost every day from not making a decision.

What is there to think about? Most of the time if we have to think about something, it’s because we don’t have a clear vision for what we really want. People are so focused on the day-to-day minutiae of life, that they cannot set their sights down the road on the bigger prize. It’s interesting to ask people the question “what do you want?” Most people respond with something generic like “happiness”, “make a lot of money”, “world peace”, etc. If someone asked you “what do you want?”, could you answer the question? Knowing what you want is the first step in being a decisive decision maker.

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Considering your priorities and reorganizing priorities based on what is going to get you another step closer to your goal every day is a skill. We are all busy being busy. Nobody on the planet thinks they aren’t “busy”.

Why do so few people exceed their goals in life? They have their priorities out of order. If your priority is to become the number one producer, become financially independent and build wealth, then why are you spending so much time checking email, reading up on current events and chit-chatting with your co-workers by the coffee machine? You should spend 90-95% of your time doing things that only you can do with your unique skills and talents. Understanding your priorities will help you to stay focused on the things that only you can do.

All that is left now that you know what you want and you’ve got your priorities reorganized daily is to take action. Stop thinking. Pick up the phone. Book the trip. Ask the girl of your dreams out on a date.

Stop thinking and start doing. Make decisions. Be decisive. If 90% of your decisions are right, then the 10% that are wrong will be made up from making more positive decisions.

Vanderbilt University Marketing Class Lessons

Posted in Motivational, Sales Coaching, Sales Tips with tags , on February 12, 2016 by Dustin Hillis

Vanderbilt University Marketing Class

“Who thinks they are going to be in sales when they graduate?” is the question I kicked off my class lecture with in the business class at Vanderbilt University. Which is the same question I’ve asked in my last six times of being their guest professor.  It amazes me every time I ask the question that no one raises their hand!

The number one thing I hope the Vanderbilt students get out of our session is that everyone is in sales no matter what profession they choose after college. At Southwestern Consulting we have doctors, lawyers, and dentist who all have gone through our 12 months coaching program to learn how to be a salesperson.  Because the hundreds of thousands of dollars they spent on their formal education didn’t teach them the most import piece of running their business, SALES!

The second thing I hope they take away from our class is that selling is serving, not forcing someone to do something they don’t want to do. One of the sharp young students asked me about a book the guy from the Wolf on Wall Street wrote. Thinking I was going to agree with his manipulation tactics and when I told him I believe the best salespeople in the world are the antithesis of the Wolf on Wall Street, he was shocked.

The third thing I hope they take away is an understanding of the art of true salesmanship and how it is a craft that can be honed just like any other profession, such as a doctor or lawyer. The younger generations have this fantasy that when they are ready to hit the working world they will just get a job, the phone will ring, and they will be doing what they love. They have no idea that what they are learning in college is a small fraction of what they need to know to be successful.

It is fun teaching this class every semester and staying in touch with the next generation of world leaders!  I hope that we all continue to reinforce and instill the right principles to our kids and the younger generations. It’s a good reminder every time I teach this class how much the world does not teach or promote the truth about what it takes to be successful in life, and it reinvigorates me to keep coaching and helping people focus on doing the right things and achieve their goals in life.

3 Ideas How to Take the Pressure Off

Posted in Motivational, Sales Coaching, Southwestern Consulting with tags , , , on February 8, 2016 by Dustin Hillis

We live in a world of unmet expectations. We are consumed with struggling through the daily grind to be successful, or stripping away stresses to find our inner-self and calmness, or indulging in everything life has to offer to just be happy. We feel “less than”, pressure, and frustrated when we don’t achieve what we are longing for. We make an idol of success, tranquility or happiness.

Tim Keller said it best in his book Counterfeit Gods, “When an idol gets a grip on your heart, it spins out a whole set of false definitions of success and failure and happiness and sadness. It redefines reality in terms of itself.”

It’s mind-boggling how some of the most successful people I know are so full of insecurity and self-doubt. The outside world thinks these people are the most successful people who have it all together, and the reality is they are freaking out on the inside and putting too much pressure on themselves. I remember feelings of extreme pressure that I would put on myself, and thoughts of being less than no matter what I accomplished or achieved.

I’m sure you’re asking yourself right now, “this sounds good, but how in the world am I supposed to do this?”

Here are 3 Ideas on how do we take the pressure off:

  1. Take a reality check. Ask yourself these two question:
    • During your idle time, where is your head at? What do you literally think about when you are left by yourself?
    • If you were 100% honest with yourself, where are you at emotionally?
  1. Find the root of the problem. Typically, there are three main root issues that cause us to put too much pressure on ourselves.
    1. “Comparison is the thief of all joy” – Any time we compare ourselves to anyone else, it creates pressure. There will always be someone else who is better, faster, better looking, stronger and smarter. We are all inadequate to everyone at something.
    2. Not having fun. – Your attitude is a choice. Your energy level is a choice. Choosing to have fun and be joyful in every single thing you do every single day is a choice.   Most people live in a reactionary state. They just let things happen to them and just think “woe is me”, or they take themselves so seriously they leave no room to simply have fun.
    3. Feeling like a failure. – Feeling like a failure is the granddaddy of all root issues when it comes to putting too much pressure on ourselves. Failure is part of life. No one is perfect. Anyone who expects to be perfect at anything will be guaranteed to feel like a failure because it’s impossible to be perfect at anything over a long period of time. At some point, we will all break. Often, it takes us reaching our breaking point to be able to accept our brokenness and dig down to the root of our problems.

3.  Focus on Unconditional Confidence.

In Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, the highest level is “self-actualization” which focuses on morality, creativity, spontaneity, problem solving, lack of prejudice and acceptance of facts.

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The difference between Maslow’s “self-actualization” and Unconditional Confidence is that Unconditional Confidence cannot be found inside yourself. Unconditional Confidence is not a goal or something you achieve. Unconditional Confidence comes from an understanding that you were created for a higher calling. You were created to die to your selfishness, and your highest achievement in life is to love, serve and care for other people. Another great book by Tim Keller – Every Good Endeavor – does an excellent job at describing in detail how to have Unconditional Confidence.

There are three types of confidences and our goal is to strive to be Unconditionally Confident.

  1. False Confidence – Faking it until you make it has its place and time. However, we need to quickly get ourselves out of a false confidence state once we embark on trying something new. False Confidence is saying you’re going to do something, or thinking you are good at something with no real evidence to back it up. There are plenty of people out there who say “I could have done that if I really wanted to” or “I’m going to be number one.” Etc.
  2. Conditional Confidence – Conditional Confidence comes into play after we’ve set the stage with our False Confidence. We’ve set an expectation for ourselves that we are supposed to be a certain way or accomplish certain things, and then when the results are less than what we hoped for, we feel defeated and less than. Conditional Confidence is contingent on results. If we win, we feel good. If we lose, we feel pressure. Conditional Confidence is equivalent to the 4th level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs – “Esteem: self esteem, confidence, achievement, respect for others, respect by others”. Most of us get stuck with Conditional Confidence our whole life.
  3. Unconditional Confidence – People who are Unconditionally Confident have figured out their purpose in life and what they are called to do. Once we have figured that out, we then get to work every day knowing we are making a difference in the world through our work habits, not our results.

If taking the pressure off is something that you need to focus on, print off this quote and read it aloud every day for the next year:

“I do not expect success all the time, but due to the belief in my gifts and God-given abilities in addition to my knowledge and acquired skills, I can be fearless in the moment. In reality, self-worth has nothing to do with the outcome. So when the pressure comes, I cannot hesitate. Knowing sometimes I will do well and sometimes I won’t, regardless, I know failure is temporary and success will happen with perseverance.”