The Buying Line

The Buying Line

“People love to buy, and hate to be sold.”

When was the last time a salesperson talked you out of buying something you wanted or needed?

The other day my friend Amanda was telling me about an experience she had with a salesman that I referred her to.  She is a perfect candidate for this high quality product the salesman was selling.  Not only was she a perfect candidate, she really needed it.  It would have increased the quality of her life.  I was shocked when I found out she didn’t buy from the gentleman I referred to her.  When I asked her why she didn’t buy, she responded with, “I don’t think I really need it” and “it cost to much.”

If you consistently have people telling you that they don’t think they need what you sell or that what you sell cost to much, it might be because your talking too much and overselling people past the buying line.

This doesn’t just happen in selling, it happens in relationships also!  I have a good friend who wants to meet a girl and get married so badly that it’s killing him.  His biggest problem is that he tries so hard that he oversells his potential prospect over the buying line, and he’s typically looking for a new girl shortly thereafter.

What is a buying line?  Simply put, a buying line is the point in time when someone is ready to make a decision.

The Buying Line

The Buying Line

How do you take someone to the buying line?

Asking well-crafted pain questions is the best way to take someone to the buying line.

How do you know when someone is at the buying line?

If they lean forward, smile and laugh, nod their head up and down, light up a cigarette, pull out their wallet, say “I want this,” “this is awesome,” “I could use something like this,” “wow,” “how much does this cost,” “do you take credit cards,” or if someone leans forward to light up a cigarette while smiling and laughing and nodding their head up and down and saying “Wow!  I want this. This is awesome.  I could use something like this! How much does this cost? Do you take credit cards?” while pulling out their wallet… they are ready to buy!

The Do’s and Don’ts after someone has crossed the Buying Line

Do:
–  Look for verbal and non-verbal cues that they’re ready to buy
–  Ask trial-closing questions to gauge their interest throughout your presentation
–  Stop what you’re saying and go straight into your Price Build Up (click here for more info on the Price Build Up:  The Price Build Up) and assumptive paperwork close
–  Pull out the order form and start assumptive filling it out
–  Answer objections before they come up
–  Create a Buying Atmosphere (click here for more information on the Buying Atmosphere:  Buying Atmosphere)

Don’t:
–  Keep talking
–  Ask “So do you want this?” or “What do you think?”
–  Make up answers to questions for which you don’t know the answer
–  Talk fast
–  Not listen to what they say
–  Assume they cannot afford it
–  Talk about yourself
–  Sell something to someone that they really won’t use

If you’re asking excellent questions and listening well your prospect will cue you in on what they want and need. Then all you have to do is stop talking and let them buy!  Sell the way people like to buy.

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3 Responses to “The Buying Line”

  1. V nice. Thanks for this article

  2. Have you ever thought about publishing an ebook or guest authoring on other
    websites? I have a blog based on the same ideas you discuss and would
    really like to have you share some stories/information. I
    know my readers would value your work. If you’re even remotely interested,
    feel free to send me an e mail.

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